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FREE AVALANCHE EDUCATION SERIES AT TMS

October 31st, 2015 By   

 

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With forecasts of El Niño ushering a potentially epic winter into the Sierra, Tahoe Mountain Sports’ upcoming Avalanche Education Series will help ensure the safety of you and your backcountry partners.

Tahoe Mountain Sports’ 2015-16 Avy Education Series presented by Ortovox is a free, three-part opportunity to learn practices that can keep you safe while participating in backcountry snow sports.

In addition to free, hands-on activities aimed at learning rescue techniques and how to use and service beacons and avalanche airbag packs, TMS will offer special, in-store deals each night during the series and raffles benefiting the Sierra Avalanche Center.

While the series is not intended to be an end-all education on avalanche safety, it is an exceptional opportunity to learn directly from Truckee-Tahoe’s resident mountain guides, avalanche safety instructors, meteorologists and local non-profits, such as the Sierra Avalanche Center.

All events are free and held at Tahoe Mountain Sports; 11200 Donner Pass Rd. in Truckee. Doors open at 6 p.m. Programs start at 6:30 p.m. For more information contact TMS at 530-536-5200 or info@tahoemountainsports.com.

Part I – Reading Avalanche Reports, Understand Mountain Forecasts & Making Good Decisions
Weds. Nov. 18 – 6:30 p.m.
Zach Tolby, a NOAA meteorologist, will discuss mountain-specific forecasts and what a strong El Niño means for the Sierra. Don Triplat from the Sierra Avalanche Center and Steve Reynaud from the Tahoe Mountain School will discuss problem solving in winter scenarios and safe backcountry movement. Interactive weather and decision-making scenarios will follow in a small group setting. Great raffle will cap it all off. Ortovox presents this event with additional support from The North Face and Black Diamond.

Part 2 – Beacons and Beers
Weds. Dec. 9 – 6:30 p.m.
Learn the basics of avalanche rescue including proper transceiver and shovel use and group-rescue strategies. Jared Rodriguez and Tom Carter of Ortovox will discuss the history and tech behind avalanche transceivers. Attendees will break into small groups for outdoor beacon practice including burial scenarios. TMS will offer discounts on products in the store this night only. TMS can update Ortovox, Mammut, Barryvox and Pieps transceivers for $5 this night only. Ortovox presents this event with additional support from The North Face and Arva Equipment.

Part 3 – Avalanche Airbag Sessions – Rep War & Party
Weds Jan. 27, 2016 6:30 p.m.
Learn the physics behind avalanche airbag packs and understand the differences between passive and active backcountry safety gear. The night’s highlight will be the “Rep War,” where representatives from major airbag companies debate each other on who makes superior airbag systems. TMS will offer free exchanges of all air or gas cylinders this night only in an effort to practice and to test your system. A season-ending raffle supporting Sierra Avalanche Center will follow with the grand prize of a Mammut airbag pack ($900 value) highlighting the evening. Ortovox presents this event with additional support from The North Face, Black Diamond, Mammut and Backcountry Access (BCA).

 

 

Leave No Trace: Adventure Dining Guide

October 29th, 2015 By   

By Michelle Shea

Who: Sam and Jenna, the Subaru Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers. Michelle Shea (host), Skyler Mullings (cameraman), Connor Stohlgren (sound)
What: Paleo car camping meal and Leave No Trace cooking methods
Where: North Lake Tahoe
When: August 2015

Click on the photo to learn more about leave-no-trace cooking techniques.

Click on the photo to learn more about leave-no-trace cooking techniques.

Spending time with Leave No Trace experts Sam Ovett and Jenna Hanger during their visit to Tahoe emphasized the importance of taking care of all the little details when cooking outdoors. By planning ahead and paying attention to what we might be leaving behind, we can all do our part to keep the wilderness pristine.

Sam and Jenna are ambassadors of the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics. The duo live, work and travel out of a brand new Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid. Sam and Jenna came to Lake Tahoe in August to work several events and were kind enough to sneak in an afternoon of hanging out on the beach, stand up paddle boarding and Paleo car cooking with the Adventure Dining Guide team.

This is an episode you don’t want to miss! Click the “view recipe” to get some more Leave No Trace tips and learn how you can prepare this healthy Paleo meal on your next camping excursion:

Check out Tahoe Mountain Sports for your outdoor culinary needs:

I hope that this episode of Adventure Dining Guide encourages you to always be responsible and to always Leave No Trace!

This post comes from Guest Blogger Michelle Shea. Michelle lives at Lake Tahoe and is the host/creator of the outdoor series Adventure Dining Guide. She created Adventure Dining Guide because “food is the unrecognized hero of our journeys, and it’s about time backcountry meals get the recognition they deserve”. Learn more at www.adventurediningguide.com

 

Still Time to ‘Fall’ into Your 2015 Sierra Adventure Bucket List

October 20th, 2015 By   

Autumn is making its presence felt over the Sierra, but Tahoe Mountain Sports ambassador Coral Rose Taylor says there still is time to do many of those summer-like adventures before the snow flies.

So with fall here, Coral is re-evaluating those activities and checking her gear bag to see what she can check off her 2015 Bucket List.

Hiking in Yosmite.

Hiking in Yosmite.

Hiking: Being lucky enough to live in the mountains, I sometimes take these geographic formations for granted. However, any time I’m lucky enough to get on the trail for a hike, I re-connect with myself, with nature, with a different perspective on time.

Here are some of the hikes I would love to do this autumn:

Tallac – An iconic Lake Tahoe hike, which I am embarrassed to admit I have not yet done, even though I’ve lived in Truckee/Tahoe for 13 years now. The challenge will be to do this before the snow flies.

Rose – Another local favorite that I haven’t yet put foot on. I’ve hiked parts of it, and around the Mt. Rose meadows, but haven’t made it to the summit proper yet.

Boundary Peak – As a native Nevadan, I feel like I owe it to myself to summit the Silver State’s highest peak. If the weather holds, I’m thinking it would be fitting to do this on Nevada Day, observed on October 30, aka Halloween Eve. This will require an extra day; with a timeline that will account for driving down 395, camping at the trailhead, hiking up, then camping another night.

Mountain biking on the Hole in the Ground Trail, with Castle Peak in the background.

Mountain biking on the Hole in the Ground Trail, with Castle Peak in the background.

Mountain Biking: Where do I start? There are so many trails in the Truckee/Tahoe area. If you add in the trails in Reno, Carson, Nevada City, Auburn, etc., you will have your work cut out for you trying to ride all of them. So, I’m putting some of my top hit-list trails on here and will see what happens. I love mountain biking in the cooler weather; the temperature is that much more conducive to longer days in the saddle without running out of water or overheating.

Flume Trail: Another Tahoe icon I have not yet been on. I’ve heard all the hype about the epic views and a few exposed sections; which I’m sure are true, I just need to get in the saddle for myself to check out.

Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride: Living in North Lake Tahoe/Truckee over the years, I have not explored the trails of South Lake very much at all. In fact, I only rode Anderson, Anderson Connector and the Corral trails for the first time this July. This sounds like an all-day adventure, but the opportunity to check out some South Lake Tahoe restaurants after a day’s hard work will make me proud to earn my turns.

Ash Canyon: This new trail has been getting rave reviews by local mountain bike groups, but I was leery of riding in the high desert on an exposed trail during the heat of the summer. I think this autumn will be the perfect time to finally ride here.

Staying warm in the Sierra.

Staying warm in the Sierra.

Camping / Backpacking: Sleeping outside, even in a tent, is such a different experience than in the comfort of my own bed. During a recent camping trip to June Lake, I was woken throughout the night by a pack of coyotes; listening to their vocalizations was so interesting and entertaining – who needs Netflix? Although the cooler weather is a challenge for me, I hope to get another night or four in a tent.

Pyramid Lake: The terminus of the Truckee River, this desert lake’s austere beauty appeals to me; even more so without the brutal heat of the high summer. The lack of trees makes for great stargazing and the salinity of the lake improves my rudimentary swimming skills! This is an easy spot for car camping, so it makes for a quick overnight.

Lola: Practically in Truckee’s backyard, there is a year-round trail here, with ample backpack camping sites near White Rock Lake or along Cold Stream.

Lake Aloha: Yes, I know that the trail out here can be as busy as Disneyland, but there’s a reason Lake Aloha is so popular – it is gorgeous and accessible. I was able to meet my sister and her boyfriend while they were through-hiking the PCT earlier this summer, but I didn’t get to spend the night there, so it’s on my hit list.

Filtering water along the trail.

Filtering water along the trail.

Gear Needed: General gear for this time of year includes the following: map (or competent guide friend), compass, cell phone (in airplane mode to disconnect from modernity and connect to self and nature), headlamp (shorter days mean this is even more important), extra layers (light windbreaker, puffy coat, beanie, gloves, emergency rain poncho), sunscreen (the Joshua Tree sunscreen smells delicious, is made in the USA, and free of nasty chemicals), electrolytes, food and water are critical.

This past year, I have been making more of my own food to bring on the trail, in lieu of bars and gels, and am really fond of the baked rice balls in the Feed Zone Portables cookbook. The date/almond rice balls are super easy and the sweet potato/bacon are a delicious savory flavor.

HIKING
I love that hiking is one of the least gear-heavy activities we can do around here, but a good pair of hiking shoes (I really like my Merrell Capras – the sticky soles offer great traction, and the wider toe box is really comfortable), and a daypack (I prefer a hydration pack so I can have my hands free) are necessary. Bonus items are trekking poles, a fancy watch, a Spot (just in case), and a GoPro to capture those epic summit pics.

MOUNTAIN BIKING
Besides the obvious mountain bike, helmet and gloves, some bonus items to bring are a cyclometer (if it’s not on Strava, it didn’t happen), a camera, and a cold beer/cider waiting for you at the car. Depending on the temperature, I may also wear pants or knee/leg warmers.

CAMPING/BACKPACKING
Camping and backpacking require the typical tent, sleeping bag, and pad, as well as a backpacking pack. Depending where you go, a bear canister is necessary. Trekking poles help, especially on descents, and I really like the MPOWERD inflatable solar lanterns for lightweight disco-fun illumination. A water filter, spork, mess kit, Jetboil, AeroPress, coffee and cup are needed as well.

I love the change of seasons and the crispness in the air, but I plan to clutch onto the last vestiges of summer as long as possible by doing as many of these adventures as I can. If you want to join me, let me know!

“Keep close to Nature’s heart…and break clear away, once in a while, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.” — John Muir

Namaste, Coral

Coral Taylor is an avid mountain biker, yogi, snowboarder and outdoor enthusiast living in Truckee, CA. Follow @c_ros on Instagram for rad photos of her adventures around Lake Tahoe and beyond. In addition to getting after it on the snow, Coral is also a Team LUNAChix Tahoe Mountain Bike Team Ambassador!

Polar Opposites: A photo journey of Antarctica in Truckee

October 5th, 2015 By   
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Todd Offenbacher and Tahoe Mountain Sports host an early season pow wow for pow featuring Todd O’s slideshow from Antarctica.

Who: Todd Offenbacher – Mammut athlete, mountaineer and Tahoe local
What: Polar Opposites: A photographic journey of ski mountaineering in Antarctica and Svalbard
When: Oct. 21 | Doors-shopping specials: 6 p.m. | Program: 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Where: Tahoe Mountain Sports; 11200 Donner Pass Rd. Truckee
Why: Get stoked for snow and raffle benefiting Sierra Avalanche Center

Truckee, CA — Join Tahoe Mountain Sports on Oct. 21 to get psyched for snow with Todd O and his Polar Opposites slideshow.

TMS will host its free, all-ages, in-store season kick-off with adventure skier and climber Todd Offenbacher (Todd O) as he takes us on a photographic journey of ski mountaineering in Antarctica and Svalbard. Along with Todd O’s stunning photography, Tahoe Mountain Sports will feature a raffle to benefit the Sierra Avalanche Center, of which Todd O is a board member.

“Penguins in the south and polar bears in the north,” Todd O says about Polar Opposites. “With a little bit of big wall climbing thrown in for fun.”

From 6 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., TMS will be offering shopping specials for those stocking up on their stoke due to Todd O’s adventures.

“It is a funny and inspiring show,” he says. “I try to explain how to get invited, or invited back, to the best trips in the world.”

The South Lake Tahoe resident and Mammut athlete is also a guide for Ice Axe Expeditions, the host for Outside TV Lake Tahoe and the creator of Tahoe Adventure Film Festival, which will premier this year on Dec. 11 at the MontBleu in South Lake Tahoe.

Tahoe Mountain Sports – www.tahoemountainsports.com(530) 536-5200

A Sky Island Kuna Crest in Yosemite

September 25th, 2015 By   

Time lapse of the recent Walker Fire outside Yosemite.

Who: Rachel McCullough
What: Hiking and climbing
Where:
Tuolumne/Yosemite National Park
When:
August 2015

It was a surprisingly warm morning last month in Yosemite National Park, which was nice because our destination for the day was more than 12,000 feet in elevation.

A week before the trip my hiking partner, Tom, and I studied the Yosemite map and bemoaned that we’d done nearly all the established trails close to the road.

So, we set our sights on a high-elevation hike with no established trail. This hike would take us to the top of Mammoth Peak at 12,117 feet and then south along the Kuna Crest, which rose and fell above and below 12,000 feet.

Mammoth Peak, our first destination.

Mammoth Peak, our first destination.

If you’ve read any of my other posts that involved Tom and Theresa (Hiking Yosemite’s Bermuda Triangle: Tenaya Canyon or Gorgeous Day Hike from Lukens Lake to Tenaya Lake in Tuolomne), you know that while we always intend to get an early start, it doesn’t actually ever happen.

We left the trailhead at 8:45 a.m. and immediately stepped off the trail and into the conifer forest, our objective coming in and out of view to the southwest.

Abandoning our usual fast clip we settled into a one-mile per hour kind of pace that involved frequently looking for the easiest route to the summit and agreeing upon our path. We went from a pond to forest to meadow to forest and then to the craggy upper reaches of Mammoth Peak.

Throughout our journey we spotted sheep poop and hoped to spot a bighorn sheep, which were rumored to be in the Mono Pass area just to our east.

We gained the ridge to the west and followed it to the summit, but not before I called a “food emergency.” Some in our group are known to realize they are absolutely starving just before the “hangry” phase sets in. Instead of the usual summit food and water break, we stopped just below the top of Mammoth Peak, with expansive views to the west, north and south.

Summit bound.

Summit bound.

This is where you can really see the difference between areas in Tuolumne that were glaciated and those that rose above the glacier. The Tuolumne domes that many are familiar with, such as DAFF, Fairview, Medlicott, and Lembert, were smoothed over into their dome shapes as the glaciers ran over them. The taller jagged peaks, such as Cathedral and Unicorn, stood above the glaciers.

We summited Mammoth Peak about four hours in, after a little more than 3.5 miles of off-trail hiking and scrambling. And that’s when we saw that the small wisps of smoke we’d spotted earlier that morning were now billowing. In those few hours, what we would later learn was the Walker Fire expanded quickly, and even closed Highway 120, which is the nearest park exit.

We signed the summit register and saw that the last party to sign had been up three days prior. We had the top to ourselves, but didn’t linger long. We headed south along the Kuna Crest.

SKY ISLAND

Walking along the Kuna Crest.

Walking along the Kuna Crest.

Kuna Crest is a sky island, which is one of the reasons Tom and I (the planners for this hike) were interested to check it out. We were drawn to it after watching the Yosemite Nature Notes Sky Island video, which explains that sky islands are isolated high elevation places with unique plant species that don’t grow anywhere else. There are a few of these sky islands in the Park and Kuna Crest happened to be relatively easy to access.

Although we didn’t see the famed blue sky pilots (you can see them in the Nature Notes video), we saw many of the other plants known to grow in the sky islands, such as alpine gold, Sierra columbine, lupine and buckwheat. From afar, you’d never guess that, such as rocky place, was full of so many plants.

We followed the Kuna Crest up and down, stopping along the way to take a time-lapse of the growing Walker Fire, which started billowing white smoke at the top of the plume partway through the day.

The nice thing about our plan was that we could find a place to come down off the crest whenever we felt like it and pick up the Mono Pass trail to walk back to the car. There was a short section of talus to get off the Crest to reach the lakes below, but after that, it was easy walking back to the trail.

We timed it well and were back to the car well before dark, and were eating our pasta dinner in no time. The only thing we didn’t time well was the line at the Tuolumne store, where we stopped to get typical camping essentials, like chips and our ice cream appetizer.

This post comes from Rachel McCullough, an avid hiker, mountain biker, rock climber, yogi, skier and photographer living in Truckee, CA. Follow @rachelmcphotos on Instagram for stunning images of beautiful Sierra scenery. When Rachel isn’t enjoying her free time in the outdoors, she’s teaching skiing at Northstar California or building and marketing websites for her clients at McCullough Web Services.

Peak Baggin’ the Eastern Sierra Nevada

September 21st, 2015 By   

ADVENTURE OF THE WEEK: Eastern Sierra
Who: Chris Cloyd
What: Trail Running/Peak Baggin’
Where: Banner Peak and Mt. Ritter
When: Sept. 12, 2015

In mid-September Tahoe Mountain Sports Ambassador Chris Cloyd set out from the Rush Creek trailhead (37.78227°N/119.09786°W) off the June Lake Loop on the eastside of the Sierra with Bill Clements and Luke Garten for a dayshot effort on Banner Peak and Mount Ritter. Check out their day in the high Sierra!
And check out the huge selection of topo maps and guide books at Tahoe Mountain Sports for your next adventure…

Using the Rush Creek trailhead for an approach of Banner Peak and Mt. Ritter isn’t the most economical (it’s closer to start at Agnew Meadows trailhead  37.68296°N/119.09263°W out of Mammoth), but Bill, Luke and I had run the River Trail before and wanted to explore a new zone. Seeing the cable tramway up from Silver Lake, the dam at Agnew Lake and new trails was well worth the extra work.

We ascended North Glacier Pass from Thousand Island Lake and refilled our water supply at Lake Catherine. From there, we ascended just north of the glacier via rock and talus to gain the saddle between Banner and Ritter. Ascending Banner was a glorified walk up via the southwest face — and well worth it.

Views of Thousand Island Lake, Mono Lake and Garnet Lake reward your efforts. Retracing our steps to the saddle, our next challenge was the north face of Ritter. Muir waxed poetic on his ascent and our route was every bit as awesome. We utilized a chute rising from the apex of the glacier and gained the summit ridge, summiting our second peak of the day in fine style.

We opted to descend down the SE face of Ritter to Ritter Lakes to take in some new scenery, regrouped at Lake Catherine and then ran back to the trailhead retracing our route. Just under 10 hours!

Chris Cloyd is a TMS Ambassador and lover of endurance sports. When Chris isn’t training for his next big run in the mountains or out exploring the Eastern Sierra on bike, he’s managing the Performance Training Center by Julia Mancuso. Watch for more race reports, gear reviews and fun reading from Chris and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

TMS OFFERS DEALS AND DEMOS FOR TAHOE IRONMAN ATHLETES

September 13th, 2015 By   
Need a race-day wetsuit or just want to take one for a demo swim? Contact TMS and we’ll get you zipped up.

Need a race-day wetsuit or just want to take one for a demo swim? Contact TMS and we’ll get you zipped up.

Tahoe Mountain Sports can’t do much to lessen the elevation for those taking on Ironman Lake Tahoe on Sept. 20, but TMS can help racers and their support crews handle chilly mountain temperatures and the cold water of the Sierra Nevada.

Whether it’s in the lake, on the bike, out on the run or spectating, Tahoe Mountain Sports has everything to cover the pre-race, post-race and race-day nutrition and gear needs of triathletes and their families.

Starting Monday, Sept. 14, Tahoe Mountain Sports, located just off the bike course in Truckee at 11200 Donner Pass Rd., kicks off its annual Ironman appreciation days with a variety of steals, deals and schwag. Make sure to stop by the store to stock up that transition bag and at the TMS booth in the Ironman Village at Squaw Valley for a chance to win gear.

Forget race-day nutrition? Don’t stress; Tahoe Mountain Sports stocks all the best offerings from Hammer, Clif, Gu, Nuun and Epic Bars.

From goggles and swim caps to wetsuits, Tahoe Mountain Sports boasts Truckee-North Tahoe’s best supply of triathlon-specific gear from Tyr, Nathan and 2XU. Need a race-day wetsuit or just want to take one for a demo swim? Contact TMS and we’ll get you zipped up.

And whether it’s a racer taking on the 26.2-mile run leg of the triathlon or the family exploring the area’s trails, Tahoe Mountain Sports has a top-of-the-line selection of footwear for road and trail running and hiking.

From free wetsuit demos and the chance to win a $100 store gift certificate, Tahoe Mountain Sports welcomes those taking on the challenge of Ironman Lake Tahoe. Good luck!

@ TAHOE MOUNTAIN SPORTS (11200 Donner Pass Rd. in Truckee)

Mon-Weds (9/14-9/16) – Take 20 percent off all nutrition products, compression and warm/cold weather gear. Check out brands like Hammer Nutrition, Gu, Clif, 2XU and CEP compression.

Ironman Week (9/14-9/20) – Free 2XU wetsuit demos all week long. While supplies and sizes last, stop by the store and take a 2XU wetsuit out for a swim in Tahoe or nearby Donner Lake. 24-hour rental rates are free; anything over 24 hours is $25/day. Race day rentals are available for $25. Inquire at the store for available sizes and rental reservations.

@ IRONMAN LAKE TAHOE EXPO AT SQUAW VALLEY

Thurs-Sat (9/17-9/20) – Visit Tahoe Mountain Sports and 2XU at the Ironman Village at Squaw Valley. There will be a huge selection of 2XU compression and triathlon gear and clothing. And don’t forget to stop by, say hi and enter to win a $100 gift certificate by signing up at the booth during the expo.

Castle Peak 100K Runners Go Big

September 2nd, 2015 By   
Chris Cloyd, TMS ambassador and Truckee local, placed third overall in his Salomon Running kit at the inaugural Castle Peak 100K.

Chris Cloyd, TMS ambassador and Truckee local, placed third overall in his Salomon Running kit at the inaugural Castle Peak 100K.

By all accounts the inaugural Castle Peak 100K trail race on Aug. 29 was a success, but by no means easy.

Of the 55 runners who started the race at 5 a.m. Saturday at Stampede Reservoir, 48 crossed the finish line at Donner Memorial State Park — the majority in the dark.

Shout out to Tahoe Mountain Sports ambassador and Truckee resident Chris Cloyd, who finished third overall. Cloyd covered the 62.5 miles and 11,000 feet of elevation in 12 hours 42 mins. Jace Ives, of Ashland, OR, hammered the course finishing first at 10 hrs 53 mins. The first woman was Roxanne Woodhouse of Weaverville, CA at 13 hrs 02 mins.

Congratulations to all who took on the Castle Peak 100K challenge. TMS looks forward to Chris’ recap of the event, next year’s race and what race organizers — Donner Party Mountain Runners — have in store for the future from racing to group runs.

And while Donner Party Mountain Runners is a great place to connect about the trail running scene, TMS has all your trail-running gear needs covered. Whether you’re gearing up for an ultra-running event or just hitting the area’s amazing trail offerings for your own running adventure, TMS has you covered from head to toe.

TRAIL RUNNING SHOES

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Salomon’s S Lab XT 6

If running 100k wasn’t challenging enough, the Castle Peak 100k threw in another surprise at mile 49 — ascending a steep, exposed cliff band in the Palisades between Mt. Disney and Mt. Lincoln. How steep? Steep enough that runners tackled the ascent assisted by ropes.

OK, not everyone is hitting rated pitches on their trail runs, but wearing shoes designed for mixed trail types will cover most situations. Salomon’s S-Lab XT 6 Trail Racing Shoes offer the company’s Contragrip, which features outsole hardness combinations for a blend of grip and durability.

The shoe company that’s taken the trail-running world by storm the last few years is Hoka. You’ve undoubtedly seen the unique shoes on the feet of your hardcore running friends. Hoka’s thick, rolling rocker and midsole geometry features a high volume, soft density rebounding foam that scores of runners swear by.

HYDRATION

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Ultimate Direction’s SJ Ultra Hydration Vest

The distance of your run will dictate your hydration needs. Will a hydration pack, vest or hand-held water bottle do the job? Whatever your needs, TMS has it all. For those long runs the Ultimate Direction SJ Ultra Hydration Vest allows for plenty of water with two 20oz bottle holders and space to accommodate a 70 oz. bladder. Another cool feature is the stretchy pockets so the vest expands as you need it.

If you’re heading out for a shorter run or just don’t like wearing a vest or pack, a hand-held water bottle may be your best option. The Salomon Park Hydro Handset  features an innovative 16-ounce flask that compresses as you drink and eliminates annoying sloshing as you deplete your liquids nearer the end of a run.

For more on the Salomon Park Hydro Handset checkout this TMS review.

Footwear and hydration are just two aspects of what will help you out on the trail. Find everything for your trail running needs from technical apparel, nutrition, headlamps and more at Tahoe Mountain Sports.

Burning Essentials… and a Bit of Bug Spray

August 27th, 2015 By   
Bugs are turning up on the playa prior to Burning Man 2015.

Bugs are turning up on the playa prior to Burning Man 2015.

Burning Man 2015 is just around the corner and we want to make it easy for burners to get last-minute supplies before venturing off to the Black Rock Desert. NOTE that this list is not all-inclusive and will not contain everything you need out on the playa, just a few things we carry at the store that will make your stay in Black Rock City more comfortable.

And, yes, it’s true: According to blog.burningman.com, there are bugs out on the playa this year, so come on into the store and peruse a variety of insect repellents.

Insect Repellents
Whether it’s some sort of Black Rock Desert bug, mosquito or other annoying creepy-crawly insect, you can find a variety of insect repellents at Tahoe Mountain Sports. Along with a variety of sprays check out the Coleman Cintronella Candle Lantern. The lantern may or may not repel the burner bugs but it does multi-task: 40-hours of pleasant-smelling, mosquito repelling ambient light.

Platypus Water Tank 6

Hydration

Burning Man is a lot of things to a lot of people, but first and foremost it is desert survival. Water is the single most important thing you can bring out on the playa. The rule of thumb is 1.5 gallons per person per day. Bring more if you are using a solar shower, mist sprayers or anything else that uses additional water. For in-camp water storage, check out 5 Gallon Foldable Water Carriers or the 6 Liter Platypus Water Tank. All of these water carriers can be folded up to save space on the way back. For hydration out on the playa, we carry a variety of hydration backpacks, hydration reservoirs and water bottles.

Bike Accessories

Bikes are an indispensable mode of transportation on the playa. You will be able to see and do more on a bicycle than you will traveling on foot and hopping on art cars or mutant vehicles. Need to carry some cargo? Check out our selection of bike bags and bike baskets. For nighttime riding, bike lights are a must. These Nite Ize Spot Lit lights are perfectly small for playa use as they can be clipped to a bike, clothing, tent door or anything you need to locate in the dark. Better yet, they cycle through the colors of the rainbow. And if you want really want to pimp your ride, check out the Nite Ize See’Em mini spoke lights for extra flair.

Sun Protection

The sun’s rays are very powerful in the high desert, and the reflection off the light-colored alkali ground amplifies the sun’s effects. Protect your skin with Sol Sunguard Altitude SPF 40 or Alpine SPF 25 sunscreen for non-greasy, sweatproof sun protection. Lip Balm is also one of the best things to have with you after a couple days in the desert. Sunglasses are a good idea as well, but will not protect your eyes against dust storms, but something like Suncloud’s Cassandra shades look great. Snow goggles, work well for keeping dust out of your eyes. A big hat like the Kavu Chillba Fisherman’s Hat is another great way to keep the sun off your face.

Read the rest of this entry »

#SendMeSeaToSummit Instagram Contest

August 11th, 2015 By   

Share your best outdoor action photos on Instagram with the hashtag #SendMeSeaToSummit and be sure to tag @SeaToSummitGear AND @TahoeMountainSports. Contest runs August 14 – September 14, 2015. Two winners will be selected to each win a new Comfort Light Insulated Sleeping Mat and Air Stream Dry Sack  Pump!

 

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Comfort Light Insulated Sleeping Mat – Reg

Comfort Light Insulated Sleeping Mat ($170.00 MSRP)The Comfort Light sleeping mats feature hybrid layer Air Sprung Cell technology – a double layer of high resolution cells in the torso for maximum comfort and insulation, and single layer of medium resolution cells in the head and legs for reduced weight. Sea to Summit uses Exkin Platinum, a quiet non-woven fabric, to reflect radiant heat loss back to the user and Thermolite insulation to prevent convective heat loss between your body and the ground.

DETAILS
– Exkin Platinum fabric and Thermolite insulation are combined to prevent radiant and convective heat loss
– Multi-function valve for easy inflation, deflation and fine tuning of air pressure
– 40D rip-stop nylon face fabric offers the right balance between weight and durability
– Sea to Summit’s TPU lamination process – one used in the medical and aeronautical industries but unique to the outdoor industry – is vastly superior to the roll-to-roll lamination process that is commonly used in outdoor products at present. The TPU bonds better and more consistently, virtually eliminating delamination issues.
– Extended storage instructions: mat should be laid flat, folded as few times as possible with valve open
Click HERE to learn more about proper use and care of your sleeping mat

AMASD

Air Stream Dry Sack Pump

Air Stream Dry Sack Pump ($35.00 MSRP)The Air Stream is Sea to Summit’s big-volume sleeping mattress pump, it’s based on their 20L Ultra-Sil Nano Dry Sack, with added valve plug and foot loop. The 20 liter Air Stream can be inflated with a single breath. Two to three cycles from the Air Stream are enough to fill Sea to Summit sleeping mats, so you’re ready to go quickly, with minimal breath condensation in your mat or dizziness from blowing the mat up. The Air Stream can be used as a 20L dry sack or ultralight pack liner.

DETAILS
– Inflates most sleeping mats in only two or three compressions
– Oval base design
– Fully seam sealed with sealable valve plug
– Made from lightweight 15D UltraSil

Click HERE to shop our great selection of Sea to Summit – Outdoor Gear!

Sea to Summit X Bowl
Sea to Summit X Bowl
MSRP: $15.95

STS

About Sea to Summit:

In 1984 a small group of climbers from the world’s flattest continent pulled off an audacious ascent of Mount Everest – they put a new route up the north face in lightweight style with no oxygen or sherpa support. Six years later, one of the summiteers, Tim Macartney-Snape decided to return to Everest after he realized neither he nor any other person who had climbed the mountain had truly climbed the entire 8,848 meters, as that would have meant starting from sea level. That is, no one had yet climbed it from “sea to summit”.

In the spring of 1990 Tim had a swim in the tepid waters of India’s Bay of Bengal then set off on foot across the Gangetic plain toward the distant Himalayan foothills. Four months later, after climbing alone from Base Camp and without the assistance of oxygen, he set foot once again on the highest point on earth. Tim’s solo ascent of Mt. Everest was named the “Sea to Summit” expedition.

Back in Australia, Tim joined forces with climbing friend, sewing enthusiast and design guru Roland Tyson to build a business that could make use of their knowledge of the outdoors to create truly ingenious, well-made but affordable outdoor equipment. They named their company Sea to Summit after Tim’s expedition and the business prospered.

Today the Sea to Summit brand continues to provide innovative gear and serves a growing band of outdoor enthusiasts all over the world.

Sea to Summit | TMS #SendMeSeaToSummit Instagram Contest Rules

– One entry per user. Must be 18 years or older. Winner pays shipping outside continental U.S.

– Giveaway period runs today through September 14, 2015. Two winners will be selected on September 15 and contacted via Instagram.

– User has read and reviewed the Tahoe Mountain Sports Privacy Policy.

– No purchase is necessary.

– Any and all purchases from Tahoe Mountain Sports (or any of its respective channels) will not improve one’s chances of winning.

– Winner(s) of the will not hold Tahoe Mountain Sports responsible for any/all warranty issues that arise with the giveaway. Sea to Summit assumes all responsibility for any/all warranty issues with the products in the #SendMeSeaToSummit Instagram Contest.

– Tahoe Mountain Sports shall be primary contest sponsor and is the principal place of business (11200 Donner Pass Rd. E5, Truckee, CA 96161).

– Tahoe Mountain Sports will contact the winner via Instagram. Entrants must provide a valid email.

– Free Shipping available in the Continental US only. Any shipments outside of the US are the responsibility of the winner.

– This contest is only open to people in the United States and Canada.

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