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Join The North Face Athlete Conrad Anker at Truckee Opening Party!

October 18th, 2014 By   

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Meet and interact with one of the best in the alpine climbing community, Conrad Anker! As Tahoe Mountain Sports celebrates the opening of its new location in Truckee, CA, Conrad will be present to sign posters, answer questions and lead an informal discussion about his inspirational adventures around the world. TMS will offer gear and clothing specials in the store this night only! Join in several interactive contests with Conrad Anker to win a limited edition signed poster. Additionally, anyone that purchases North Face products (over $100) will receive a free gift with purchase. This event is free and open to the public.

Tahoe Mountain Sports has always been a champion of pioneers in the outdoor sports community. With Conrad Anker in town, The North Face Face and Tahoe Mountain Sports are excited to offer an amazing opportunity to the Truckee-Tahoe community to meet a legendary alpine climber and hero to many while learning more about the world of alpine sports.

Where: Tahoe Mountain Sports (New Location: Safeway Shopping Center 11200 Donner Pass Rd, Truckee, CA | Ph: 530.536.5200)

When: Wednesday, October 22, 2014 ~ 4:00 – 7:00 pm

Join the Event on Facebook

Conrad Anker (Bio): Conrad Anker’s specialty, simply put, is climbing the most technically challenging terrain in the world. This quest has taken him from the mountains of Alaska and Antarctica to the big walls of Patagonia and Baffin Island and the massive peaks of the Himalaya.

Conrad’s Antarctic experience spans a decade, with first ascents in three regions. In 1997, Conrad teamed up with Alex Lowe and Jon Krakauer to climb Rakekniven, a 2,500-foot wall in Queen Maud Land. In the Sentinel Range, Conrad climbed the Vinson Massif via three new routes. His climbs in Pakistan’s Karakoram include the west face of Latok II along the “Tsering Mosong” route (which begins at the same height as the summit of Denali) where he climbed 26 pitches on a vertical cliff and then topped out at 23,342 feet.

In 1998, Conrad and Peter Croft made a first ascent of Spansar Peak via a 7,000-foot ridge in one day. In Patagonia, he climbed the three towers of the Cerro Torre Massif. On Yosemite’s El Capitan he joined Steve Gerberding and Kevin Thaw to establish “Continental Drift,” a steep “nail-up” on the right side. And in Zion National Park, Mugs Stump and Conrad first climbed the intimidating “Streaked Wall”.

In May of 1999, as a member of the Mallory & Irvine Research Expedition, Conrad discovered the body of George Mallory, the preeminent Everest explorer of the 1920s. The disappearance of Mallory and Sandy Irvine on their summit bid in June 1924 is one of climbing’s great mysteries, and Conrad’s discovery and analysis of the find has shed new light on the pioneering climbs of the early expeditions.

In October 2011, Conrad, Jimmy Chin and Renan Ozturk summited one of the last great unclimbed features of the Himalayas by topping out on the Shark’s Fin route on the northwest face of 20,700-foot Meru in the Garhwal Himalaya. In the game of high-altitude, big-wall mountaineering, the previously unclimbed route represents one of the world’s ultimate mountaineering tests, with the lower third a classic alpine snow-and-ice route, the middle a mix of ice and rock, and the final section an extremely difficult, overhanging headwall. The Shark’s Fin has drawn many of the world’s top alpinists over the past 30 years, none of them able to finish the route.

Conrad graduated from the University of Utah and lives in Bozeman, Montana, with his wife and three sons. Anker serves on the board of the Conservation Alliance, the Rowell Fund for Tibet and the Alex Lowe Charitable Foundation. “My involvement with these organizations is intrinsically rewarding,” Conrad says “and it’s among the most important work I do. It feels good to be able to give back to our community of humans and to the natural world.”

Learn more about Conrad via his athlete profile.

Hiking Yosemite’s Bermuda Triangle: Tenaya Canyon

October 15th, 2014 By   

This post comes from Rachel McCullough, an avid hiker, mountain biker, rock climber, yogi, skier and photographer living in Truckee, CA. Follow @rachelmcphotos on Instagram for stunning images of beautiful Sierra scenery. When Rachel isn’t enjoying the outdoors, she’s teaching skiing at Northstar California or building and marketing websites for her clients at McCullough Web Services.

The emerald pools and gigantic boulders of the Inner Gorge

Who: Rachel, Theresa, Tom, Denis, Mat
What: Tenaya Canyon ascent
Where: Yosemite National Park, CA
When: September, 2014
Gear: Sawyer Point Squeeze Filter,  Altra Lone Peak Trail Running ShoesBlack Diamond Primrose Harness

All photos by Rachel McCullough unless captioned otherwise.

Disclaimer: Hiking/Canyoneering in Tenaya Canyon is dangerous. This blog post is not a recommendation for you to try the route.

There were many reasons NOT to go to Tenaya Canyon. For starters, there is its reputation as the Bermuda Triangle of Yosemite. Then there is the curse that Chief Tenaya invoked when white men killed his son. If you don’t believe in that, there is a Google search results page plastered with stories of helicopter ride exits, as some sort of proof. Not even John Muir escaped unscathed on this 10+ mile journey. He found himself slipping, somersaulting, and then losing consciousness, only to be spared by the dense shrubbery on the route. Then there was the forecast: 40% chance of afternoon thunderstorms.

If all that wasn’t enough, closer to home, Alpine Meadows was charging their snowmaking system as the King Fire scorched tens of thousands of acres less than ten miles away. Facebook lit up with talk of being ready to evacuate. The list goes on. So what possessed me to leave a list of what should be saved with my husband in the event of a fire evacuation and make the six-hour journey to Yosemite?  It was the lure of the remote off-trail experience, the promise of emerald pools, glacier-carved canyon walls, unparalleled views, time with good friends, old and new, and the challenge.

And while we didn’t emerge from Tenaya canyon unscathed, we did emerge having had the adventure of a lifetime. Just not one to be repeated in the same fashion, ever again.

Most people approach Tenaya Canyon from the top as a canyoneering route, rappelling through waterfalls and landing in ice cold pools. Seeing as in my ten years at Lake Tahoe, I’ve only swam in the lake once (gasp), a water-logged adventure didn’t sound appealing, and neither did the toe-crushing slab descents. So, with all of us having a rock climbing background, and in true John Muir form, we decided to go up.

The evening before our planned trip, as I arrived at Olmstead Point, which overlooks Tenaya Canyon, I saw, well, nothing. The King Fire smoke had followed me to Yosemite, and was so thick that the normally prominent Half Dome was invisible. We hoped it would clear before morning and we weren’t disappointed.

We started at Mirror Lake at around 7am, only a half hour behind our planned schedule. Our crew is not known for our timely morning departures (more about that here: http://bit.ly/TuolumneHike).

Read the rest of this entry »

Be the First to Get a NEW GoPro Hero4!

October 3rd, 2014 By   

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We are one of the first retailers in not only the country but, in California to offer the NEW GoPro HERO4 cameras! Learn how you can be notified when they arrive by clicking HERE!

The new GoPro HERO4 camera. All around the world GoPros are capturing incredible moments, from the heart-stopping to the heartfelt. See how GoPro’s new line of our most advanced cameras yet allow you to beautifully and authentically capture and share the experiences that bring purpose, adventure and joy to your life.

GoPro HERO4: Even more spectacular image quality, including incredible low light capabilities. 2X the high fidelity sound. Faster processing. Impressive 4K30 frame rates. Protune settings that unlock manual control of many of your GoPro’s features, and so much more.

Discover all of the capabilities of the HERO4:

Thank You Kings Beach!

October 3rd, 2014 By   

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Yes the rumors are true, Tahoe Mountain Sports is in fact moving to a new location, however, the same values and commitment to excellent customer service will follow us from our long-time home in Kings Beach to our brand new store in Truckee!

Tahoe Mountain Sports was created around a campfire outside Truckee in 2005. What started as an e-commerce operation, transformed a year later into our first retail store, in Kings Beach. We started on one side, took over the upstairs and then expanded to the entire building. All through that time, we have been investing in our e-commerce platform, mobile optimizations and multi-channel strategy to ensure our virtual and physical presence is consistent. Our four distinct principles: old-fashioned customer service, forward thinking e-commerce, environmental responsibility and community focus will continue to be our guiding light as we embark on the next phase in Tahoe Mountain Sports’ history with our new move.

A heartfelt THANK YOU goes out to the greater Kings Beach community for supporting us over the past 8 years! It is with a bittersweet feeling that we part ways with the storefront at 8331 N. Lake Blvd and open our doors at the new store located in the Safeway Shopping Center at 11200 Donner Pass Rd. in Truckee, CA.

We’re not changing, we’re just moving. We know that you’re here for the gear. That’s why we keep our products at the forefront of everything we do. From ensuring we carry brands that top industry quality and environmental standards to personally testing our products to know we’re selling you the best, Tahoe Mountain Sports is a place you can trust to bring you quality outdoor gear, clothing and footwear.

YOU (our loyal customers) can help us lighten our load with this transition. That means HUGE savings will be flowing store-wide during our moving sale. Swing in to save 40-70% on all apparel and 30%-50% on all footwear & gear from 10 am – 6 pm Thursday to Saturday (October 2nd-5th) and from 10 am – 1 pm on Sunday, October 5th (before we close our doors in Kings Beach).

We hope that you have enjoyed the time we have been able to share with you in Kings Beach! From numerous events, community support projects and a multitude of opportunities to provide you with insight and discounts on the best in quality outdoor gear, clothing and footwear, we have been proud to call Kings Beach home. We’ll see you all in Truckee!

Sincere Thanks,

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Moving Sale!

October 1st, 2014 By   
Come in for our HUGE Moving to Truckee Sale!

Come in for our HUGE Moving to Truckee Sale!

We’re moving to Truckee! That means HUGE savings will be extended to you, our loyal customers. Help us lighten our load with killer deals!

  • 40-70% Off All Apparel
  • 30%-50% Off All Footwear & Gear

Hours:
Thursday, Oct. 2nd: 10 am – 6 pm
Friday, Oct. 3rd: 10 am – 6 pm
Saturday Oct. 4th: 10 am – 6 pm
Sunday Oct. 5th: 10 am – 1 pm (Then the Kings Beach doors close)

A heartfelt THANK YOU goes out to the greater Kings Beach community for supporting us over the past 10 years! It is with a bittersweet feeling that we part ways with the storefront at 8331 N. Lake Blvd and open our doors at the new store located in the Safeway Shopping Center at 11200 Donner Pass Rd. E5. in Truckee, CA.

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New Truckee, CA Location!

Tahoe Mountain Sports is founded on four distinct principles: old-fashioned customer service, forward thinking e-commerce, environmental responsibility and community focus. These principles will continue to be our guiding light as we embrace yet another outstanding community.

We hope that you have enjoyed the time we have been able to share with you in Kings Beach! From numerous events, community support projects and a multitude of opportunities to provide you (our loyal customers) with insight and discounts on the best in quality outdoor gear, clothing and footwear ,we have been proud to call Kings Beach home.

We’re not changing, we’re just moving. We know that you’re here for the gear. That’s why we keep our products at the forefront of everything we do. From ensuring we carry brands that top industry quality and environmental standards to personally testing our products to know we’re selling you the best, Tahoe Mountain Sports is a place you can trust to bring you quality outdoor gear, clothing and footwear.

Stay connected, be sure to follow Tahoe Mountain Sports online:

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Gorgeous Day Hike from Lukens Lake to Tenaya Lake in Tuolomne

September 12th, 2014 By   

This post comes from Rachel McCullough, an avid hiker, mountain biker, rock climber, yogi, skier and photographer living in Truckee, CA. Follow @rachelmcphotos on Instagram for stunning images of beautiful Sierra scenery. When Rachel isn’t enjoying the outdoors, she’s teaching skiing at Northstar California or building and marketing websites for her clients at McCullough Web Services.

Cathedral Creek canyon

Endless granite on the descent into the canyon of the South Fork of Cathedral Creek

Who: Theresa, Tom, Garrett, Rachel
What: 26 Mile Day Hike
Where: Ten Lakes area, Tuolumne high country, Yosemite National Park
When: A Saturday in August, 2014
Gear: Altra Lone Peak Trail Running Shoes, Nemo Losi 3 Person Tent, PowerPot Charging Package, Sawyer Point Squeeze Filter

All photos by Rachel McCullough unless captioned otherwise.

One day I decided to walk 55 miles. In a day. Not just any 55 miles, but the entire High Sierra Camp loop in Yosemite National Park, with over 8,000 feet in elevation gain and loss. I hadn’t hiked more than 15 miles in a day, but that didn’t seem to matter. So, I did it. And I dragged along my then boyfriend, now husband. Maybe for company, maybe to see if he was crazy enough, maybe to see if he could keep up. And that was my first taste of the yet to be named sport of hiking a lot in one day. [Please tell me in the comments what you think it should be called: long-distance day hiking, ultra day hiking, plain old craziness, a John Muir saunter…?]

I’ve kept it under 45 miles since then, but still get all sorts of looks and questions on these long hikes. “Wait, where are your big backpacks?” “You are going where?” “You mean (put any much closer destination here)?” All you need is a light pack, trail running shoes, and enough water to make it to the next stop. It’s amazing how much you can see and how far you can get without a lot weight, wilderness permits, or advanced planning. I get my gear at Tahoe Mountain Sports. But more on the advanced planning later.

So, that leads me to my most recent hike in Tuolumne, a follow-up to my “Let’s walk from Wawona to the Valley hike” this spring. This one came in at about a marathon distance – 26.6 miles says the map. We started at the Lukens Lake Trailhead and passed through Ten Lakes before arriving at our destination, the Murphy Creek Trailhead. We added a short detour to Grant Lake because 26 miles sounded better than 24 miles.

The crew. I’ve had many adventures with this group: Garrett, my husband, and Tom and Theresa, our good friends who live in Yosemite. As usual, we set our starting time, slept in a bit later than we should have, and then slowly got ready. A group of mostly night owls should not rise before 6 a.m., but we can certainly try! We hit the trail late, around 7:30 a.m., which meant that if we wanted to finish by dark, there would be no dilly-dallying.

00 the crew ready to go

Crew selfie: Tom, Theresa, me, Garrett. Bright-eyed and ready to head out into the crisp morning air. Photo: Garrett McCullough

But, we forgot that we were in a hurry, when just a half-mile in, we arrived at Lukens Lake. It was perfectly still, except for the layer of fog dancing along the surface and then rising before disappearing into the warming morning air. John Muir once said about hiking: “I don’t like either the word or the thing. People ought to saunter in the mountains – not hike!”  So, we stopped, took our time, then we sauntered along.

Lukens Lake

Morning fog rising off of Lukens Lake.

The next gem we found was a slightly nibbled red fir cone, which revealed the brilliant red inside. Two things were amazing about this: none of us had ever seen this before and red firs are apparently named for the color of their bark, not the inside of their cone!

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The inside of a red fir cone!

As the morning passed, Read the rest of this entry »

Tahoe 200 Endurance Race Footwear Surprise w/ Mark Cangemi

September 11th, 2014 By   

Mark Cangemi of Pennsylvania placed 16th in last weekend’s Tahoe 200 endurance run, the premiere 202-mile footrace around Lake Tahoe. When he dropped by the shop two days later, he had quite the story for us. He started in a pair of Hoka shoes, then moved into the Altra Olympus, before finishing in a pair of ___________! After hearing his surprising confession, I grabbed a camera and asked him to repeat himself. Thanks for the cool story, Mark. And thanks for letting us gear you up for your big adventure!

Canoeing, Fishing (sort of) and Camping at Faucherie Lake

September 6th, 2014 By   

This trip report comes from Robyn Embry, a local pro downhill racer living in Kings Beach, California, for the past seven years. She can be found climbing rocks and skiing powder when not enjoying life on two wheels; Fine more from Robyn at http://therobynator.blogspot.com.

faucherie lake camping

Faucherie Lake had been spoken of highly by several friends who spend time there yearly, and we had always thought it would be fun to check it out. It’s hard to get far away from crowds by car on a busy summer weekend, but we took a gamble figuring it was a bit out of the way and the road is quite rough. Looking for a paddle-in campsite is also a good way to avoid the masses, and gave us an advantage over the car campers.

Getting to the lake required 2 ½ hours of bouncing up rock-studded dirt roads. After nearly losing the canoe off the top and fearing the destruction of other key items, we finally reached the lake, intact. Off came the canoe and we began stuffing gear into waterproof dry bags. Though sleeping under the stars is nice, a tent seemed ideal for this trip if we intended to keep mosquitoes away. Inflatable sleeping pads went in as well, which had not been used in at least a few summers since I’ve been too busy with bike racing.

For food and kitchen we went for luxury, packing a cooler full of good eats and hauling along the old 3-burner camp stove. The canoe should still stay afloat, and it would be worth carrying the weight since the paddle to camp is short. It might be ideal to pack lighter for a longer trip on a river or larger lake, bringing a backpacking stove and maybe some dehydrated camp meals, though the advantage of a canoe is being able to carry a fair amount more than would comfortably fit in a backpack. We did, however, pack a water filter instead of lugging in a full jug. After all, we were camping near a pretty decent water source.

campsites faucherie lake

Upon launching the canoe, Read the rest of this entry »

Overnight Trail Running Lake Tahoe – Across Desolation Wilderness

August 30th, 2014 By   

This post comes from Chris Cloyd, a TMS Ambassador and lover of endurance sports. When Chris isn’t training for his next big race or out exploring the Eastern Sierra on foot or bike, he’s managing the Performance Training Center by Julia Mancuso. Watch for more race reports, gear reviews and fun reading from Chris and other Ambassadors of Tahoe Mountain Sports.

As I touched on in “Philosophy and Preparation“, this was to be my most ambitious outing to date: a 29-35 mile run (depending on which map/GPS/hearsay you choose to believe), an overnight at Lake Aloha, a summit of two of the highest peaks in Desolation Wilderness (Mt. Price and Pyramid Peak), and an 18-22 mile run to return to the real world. Per usual, I sat down with my maps (the Lake Tahoe Basin Trail Map and the National Geographic 803) and plotted my days (and night), planning every step before I set out. As a good friend once detailed to me: failure to prepare is preparing to fail.

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Chris Cloyd, Trail Runner.

I chose to set out from the Meeks Bay Trailhead (the northernmost entry point into Desolation Wilderness), and was thrilled with the trail from the outset. The Meeks Bay Trailhead gains you access to the Tahoe-Yosemite Trail – a continuous single track from Meeks Bay to Yosemite National Park. Every bit living up to its billing, the trail was in immaculate condition. At the trailhead, you can procure a day permit into Desolation, but I had to obtain an overnight permit from their website (or I could have gone to the Meeks Bay campground). If I may stand on my pedestal for a moment and preach: obtain a permit before overnighting in Desolation. I’m sure you can avoid getting “caught” (you are meandering through the wilderness, after all), but the funds go to supporting trail stewardship and other amenities that we all enjoy, so swallow the $5. Our support goes a long way toward maintaining and providing access to the Wilderness that we all enjoy.

The Tahoe-Yosemite Trail progresses steeply beginning from close to the trailhead all the way up to Lake Genevieve, gaining almost 1,500 in those initial miles. Lake Genevieve is the first of no less than seven lakes that you’ll encounter in your first eight or so miles, and kicks off a beautiful section of scenic running. Of these lakes, I found Stony Ridge Lake to be the most engaging – I was very tempted to pull off the trail and dive in for a swim. That being said, I was on a mission, and had my sights set for Phipps Peak before I stopping for a break. The running continued along these alpine lakes before starting the ascent to Phipp’s Pass. In my planning, I noted that my first day included two very notable mountain passes – Phipp’s Pass and Dick’s Pass – and was prepared for a slog up a number of single track switchbacks. Although not too steep or unrelenting, Phipp’s Pass is indeed worthy of respect and is sure to sap the leg strength of all who choose to ascend it. Upon reaching the pass proper, it’s a short and quick scramble to the top of Phipp’s Peak, and is well worth the effort. I enjoyed some rest and a sandwich at the summit, and admired the expanse of Desolation in a stunning 360 degrees.

“I geared down and buried myself for what seemed like an hour – it was indeed much less, but time has teeth under such scenarios”

Continuing on, I was treated to a blissful descent from Phipp’s Pass toward Middle Velma Lake. I enjoyed this section of running very much, and found a comfortable tempo that helped quiet the mind and brought considerable joy. I chose to stay on the Pacific Crest Trail in order to catch a glimpse of Fontanillis Lake, and that decision was validated in spades. My overnight destination on this day wins the award for my “favorite” lake on this route, but Fontanillis Lake is gorgeous and has a very unique alpine feel to it, framed defiantly by Dick’s Peak and its equally proud neighbors. I stopped here to filter some water and take in the ambiance, gearing up for the next push. Fontanillis has earned an earmark for a future overnight destination, for sure.

Fontanillis precedes the second big climb of the day, Dick’s Lake to Dick’s Pass. Perhaps it was my tempo (maybe a bit too full of ambition for my legs to accommodate), or perhaps it was the miles themselves that preceded it, but this climb hurt my feelings. I geared down and buried myself for what seemed like an hour – it was indeed much less, but time has teeth under such scenarios – and with much labor and more than a little self-deprecation I took the pass with much relief. As though it was placed there with intention, a perfect sitting-stone is perched at the Pass and it concedes a spectacular panorama of much of the Wilderness.

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Chris didn’t take this photo of Desolation. His editor had to pull it from a free image site after accidentally using the original in Round 1.

Descending from Dick’s Pass requires technical running, and was a true test of my reflexes this deep into the day. Cascading down toward Gilmore Lake, I was treated to glimpses of Mt. Tallac and my day’s destination of Lake Aloha, and my spirits were buoyed. Nerves and light were fading, and a reassurance that I was nearing my “finish line” for the day was greatly appreciated.  Read the rest of this entry »

30 Hikes in 30 Days in the Lake Tahoe Basin: Round 2

August 28th, 2014 By   

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TMS Ambassador Justeen Ferguson aka @SummitHunnies tackled a major pedi-project this summer. She hiked a new trail in the greater Lake Tahoe area each day for 30 days and reported back to us with details. Most were family-friendly. Some involved 4WD roads, some were strictly singletrack, and several were straight-up bushwhacks. Here are the second ten descriptions of her 30 hikes. Catch up on the first ten here, and stay tuned for the final ten, coming soon to your favorite outdoor sports blog.

What: #11 – 20, 30 Tahoe Day Hikes in 30 Days
When: July- August, 2014
Gear Used (and sworn by):
Lake Tahoe Basin Adventure Map, Lightweight Women’s Hiking Shoes,Eco-Friendly “Soft” Water Bottle, Organic Trail Snacks

*Take this information and use it as you will. Tahoe Mountain Sports is not responsible for accident, injury, or anyone getting lost trying to replicate this Summit Hunnie’s routes.

Day 11 – Coyote Mountain aka Cowboy Peak
Right in the heart of Meyers lays a nice little mountain; I went into this thinking, Oh, piece of cake. I’ll get a nice hike in before work. I was so wrong! This trail starts behind the Humane Society and practically goes straight up, and the trail back down is also really steep. Once you are covered in sweat and your legs are on fire, there is a wonderful view of South Lake Tahoe and Echo Summit. This hike is recommended for someone who wants a quick yet fulfilling workout.

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Day 12 – Desolation Wilderness behind Fallen Leaf Lake
The trailhead is located on the southern end of Fallen Leaf Lake, the same trail used to get out to Grass Lake from Day 1 of my 30 Tahoe Hikes. This route takes you out and back over a beautiful bridge and alongside some amazing mountains. You’re given a number of route options: continue traversing along the mountain side, make your way even further out toward a variety of lakes, or, if you are up for it, eventually make your way to the top of Mount Tallac. It’s a perfect place for all levels and abilities because hikers can decide how strenuous they want their hike to be. It is beautifully covered with both trees and wild flowers, and has great views of Fallen Leaf Lake.

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Day 13 – Back of Dunlap Mountain
This trail is a trip! I accidently stumbled upon it on my way to Angora Lake. The beginning of the trail is just before the main gate to Angora Road. It’s a singletrack that takes you the opposite way of Angora, along the backside of Tahoe Mountain (from day 10) and all the way down to the infamous Camp Richardson. This is an easy hike, great for trail running or beginning mountain bikers, and ideal for walking the dogs. There is also a lovely view of Tallac almost the entire way. Beware of fallen trees…there’s some mandatory log-hopping but it’s a lot of fun!

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Day 14 – Big Chief
This amazing rock/mountain trail is near the town of Truckee. It’s a perfect little hike that leads to the Big Chief climbing area [link to big chief climbing Tahoe Info page] where we stopped to do some rock climbing! I like this hike because the trek out isn’t too tough and there are some rad trees and amazing rock formations to gander at. If you’re not a rock climber you can still enjoy the beauty of this cool rock! Try playfully climbing around and up the back of it to enjoy the view from the top! There are trails that take you beyond the Big Chief climbing area and out toward the woods with pretty views of the mountain ranges. The area has a very relaxing feel and is great for all abilities of hikers, bikers and trail runners. However, if you want to be adventurous and climb Big Chief, I highly recommend finding a buddy and making it happen. It makes the hike that much more rewarding!

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Day 15 – Five Lakes
The Five Lakes trail starts on Alpine Meadows Road and winds its way between the Alpine Meadows and Squaw Valley ski resorts, providing wonderful scenery the entire time. Read the rest of this entry »

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